conference

Huge conference, tiny virus

Huge conference, tiny virus

Tiffany, a PhD student in the Roach lab, attended her first phage conference this week in the beautiful Olympia, Washington! Phages are the world’s tiniest organisms: and as viruses that infect bacteria, they have recently gotten the scientific world’s eye as a promising treatment for bacterial infections. Tiffany had a blast presenting her research, chugging a TON of coffee (as one does at conferences), and attending workshops of the latest and greatest in the phage world, including her own mentor, Dr. Dwayne Roach.

There was even dance parties. Lots and lots of dance parties. Sounds like a blast, Tiff!

At an Elasmobranch conference, the shark jokes quickly wear fin

At an Elasmobranch conference, the shark jokes quickly wear fin

Sharks… in the mountains??

This week, our writer Elana had the opportunity to represent her lab - the Shark Research and Conservation program at the University of Miami - at the Conference of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists in Snowbird, Utah, held by the American Elasmobranch Society. This magical meeting of shark and reptile enthusiasts brought together a suite of researchers all focusing on cartilaginous fish: aka sharks, skates, and rays. Needless to say, Elana was in heaven!

At the conference, Elana proudly presented part of her masters’ research, and the talk was a huge success; she even got a collaborator out of it. It’s always nice to feel “in your element,” especially in the sciences, where you are normally surrounded by things you don’t know. Congratulations, and glad you had fun!!

Bacteria, lobster dinnahs and some really cool science

Bacteria, lobster dinnahs and some really cool science

Congratulations to two of our writers, Ricky and Jason, who presented their research at the Gordon Research Conference for Environmental Microbiology last week! Scientific conferences are an awesome way to not only share your own research (and get new ideas), but also to hear about the latest advances happening in science. This particular conference was held in Boston, so you can bet they served us plenty of Chowda and that the Sam Adams flowed freely.

Conferences are usually a really fun thing for us scientists to go to; they provide a break from the usual routine and give us a chance to show off our work. You always come back feeling a little more successful and accomplished than when you left, and that leaves us wanting more. Now, back to the lab bench. Those bacteria aren’t going to grow themselves.

Conferences that Change Lives

Conferences that Change Lives


Two of our founders, Blaide and Jason, were chosen to attend the ComSciCon national workshop last week in San Diego, to promote PassioInventa and learn a little bit about scientific communication along the way. In this 3-day workshop, 50 graduate students from all over the world were brought together to begin a conversation on how to blend our science with art forms to make it more palatable to non-scientific audiences. Famous photographers, cartoonists, magazine editors, comedians, and more led seminars and workshops to share how they’ve been successful in SciCom, and our network grew substantially - we even added a few new writers to the team! Big ideas coming soon.

Sorting his way to the top - one cell at a time

Sorting his way to the top - one cell at a time

BIG congratulations to Alex, who won a big award this week - the Excellence in Cytometry award from the Southern California Flow Cytometry Association, or SoCal Flow (yes, it is just as cool as it sounds). Flow cytometry, one of the techniques Alex uses in his research, is something we scientists use to sort different types of cells based on their physical characteristics.

Alex was invited to give an oral presentation at the University of California, Irvine; the only student presenter to be included in the conference that day, and his talk was given right before a keynote speaker from CalTech. Talk about prestige. Keep it up man!